All Care Guides

Cranial Cruciate Ligament Rupture

Cranial cruciate ligament (CCL) rupture is one of the most common orthopedic problems in dogs. A dog’s stifle joint corresponds to the human knee joint, and the CCL is comparable to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in humans. Just as in humans, a partial or complete rupture of this ligament is debilitating and extremely painful, resulting in lameness and joint instability. Untreated, CCL rupture results in additional degenerative changes in the joint and, eventually, osteoarthritis. CCL rupture can occur in any dog. Risk factors include obesity, existing osteoarthritis or instability in the knee, and a lack of proper conditioning for the activity taking place, such as a normally sedentary dog that suddenly begins vigorous play.

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Dental Cleaning

It’s estimated that 85% of all pets have periodontal disease by the time they are 3 years of age. Periodontal disease is a progressive disease of the supporting tissues surrounding teeth and the main cause of early tooth loss.

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Deworming/Parasite Prevention in Horses

Parasites are of significant concern in horses. Infection with intestinal parasites may cause mild symptoms to severe, life threatening disease.

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Diarrhea

A pet with diarrhea has looser or more watery feces than normal and sometimes more frequent stools as well.

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Disruptive Compulsive Behaviors (Stereotypes) in Horses

Stereotypies are undesirable, repetitive patterns of behavior that may prevent an affected horse from eating and sleeping.

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